explorationimages:

Cassini: Saturn casts a shadow on its rings, 9/18/2012.
 W00075490.jpg was taken on September 18, 2012 and received on Earth September 20, 2012. The camera was pointing toward SATURN-RINGS at approximately 1,381,147 miles (2,222,740 kilometers) away, and the image was taken using the CL1 and CL2 filters. 
Image Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

explorationimages:

Cassini: Saturn casts a shadow on its rings, 9/18/2012.

W00075490.jpg was taken on September 18, 2012 and received on Earth September 20, 2012. The camera was pointing toward SATURN-RINGS at approximately 1,381,147 miles (2,222,740 kilometers) away, and the image was taken using the CL1 and CL2 filters.
Image Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

opontoazul:

E se a Terra tivesse anéis como Saturno? (por Ckesk)

If The Earth Had Rings Like Saturn

the-star-stuff:

Saturn-rise Over the Lake
This is an artist’s depiction of a large lake on Titan, as seen from the surface. The landscape is at once alien and familiar: peaceful waves lapping at the shoreline contrast with a strangely-colored sky lit by the bright rings and body of Saturn.
While this image is fanciful, astronomers may get a chance to capture even more spectacular views if the Titan Mare Explorer (pdf) is selected to fly to Saturn. This mission would land a small boat-like probe on a large lake of Titan – likely Kraken or Ligeia Mare – in order to explore the seas of another world.
Images: 1) NASA

the-star-stuff:

Saturn-rise Over the Lake

This is an artist’s depiction of a large lake on Titan, as seen from the surface. The landscape is at once alien and familiar: peaceful waves lapping at the shoreline contrast with a strangely-colored sky lit by the bright rings and body of Saturn.

While this image is fanciful, astronomers may get a chance to capture even more spectacular views if the Titan Mare Explorer (pdf) is selected to fly to Saturn. This mission would land a small boat-like probe on a large lake of Titan – likely Kraken or Ligeia Mare – in order to explore the seas of another world.

Images: 1) NASA

the-star-stuff:

The storm clouds of Saturn are bigger than our entire planet

This striking image from the Cassini orbiter shows Saturn’s northern hemisphere engulfed in a massive storm that has raged for well over a year. This storm was bigger than Earth when it began, and it’s since gotten even more massive.
This storm is an apparent example of the Great White Spot, a recurring super-storm that periodically engulfs much of the planet’s northern hemisphere. This particular storm has raged since late 2010, and it underwent a second massive eruption in April 2011. It’s been given the catchy name of the Northern Electrostatic Interference, because the storm has caused a significant spike in the amount of radio and plasma interference. Cassini has also detected a huge temperature drop in the center of the storm system.
You might wonder why this is called the Great White Spot when the clouds are clearly orange. In this case, it’s the image that’s wrong — or, at least, in false color, as it’s actually an infrared image. (That blue line is actually the rings of Saturn viewed from the side.) The orange colors indicate clouds that are deep within Saturn’s atmosphere, while the lighter colors represent those closer to the edge of the planet’s massive cloud system. This storm is thought to be associated with the dawn of spring on Saturn. Of course, that could take awhile, considering a year on Saturn is nearly three Earth decades long.
Via NASA.

the-star-stuff:

The storm clouds of Saturn are bigger than our entire planet

This striking image from the Cassini orbiter shows Saturn’s northern hemisphere engulfed in a massive storm that has raged for well over a year. This storm was bigger than Earth when it began, and it’s since gotten even more massive.

This storm is an apparent example of the Great White Spot, a recurring super-storm that periodically engulfs much of the planet’s northern hemisphere. This particular storm has raged since late 2010, and it underwent a second massive eruption in April 2011. It’s been given the catchy name of the Northern Electrostatic Interference, because the storm has caused a significant spike in the amount of radio and plasma interference. Cassini has also detected a huge temperature drop in the center of the storm system.

You might wonder why this is called the Great White Spot when the clouds are clearly orange. In this case, it’s the image that’s wrong — or, at least, in false color, as it’s actually an infrared image. (That blue line is actually the rings of Saturn viewed from the side.) The orange colors indicate clouds that are deep within Saturn’s atmosphere, while the lighter colors represent those closer to the edge of the planet’s massive cloud system. This storm is thought to be associated with the dawn of spring on Saturn. Of course, that could take awhile, considering a year on Saturn is nearly three Earth decades long.

Via NASA.

project-argus:


A pair of Saturn’s moons appear insignificant compared to the immensity  of the planet in this Cassini spacecraft view along the terminator where  day transitions to night. The larger moon Enceladus (313 miles, or 504 kilometers across) is also  on the left, just a bit closer to the center of the image. Epimetheus  (70 miles, or 113 kilometers across) appears as a tiny black speck on  the far left of the image, left of Enceladus, just below the thin line  of the rings. The rings cast wide shadows on the southern hemisphere of  the planet. This view looks toward the northern, sunlit side of the rings from just above the ringplane. The image was taken with the Cassini spacecraft wide-angle camera on  Nov. 4, 2011 using a spectral filter sensitive to wavelengths of  near-infrared light centered at 752 nanometers. The view was acquired at  a distance of approximately 746,000 miles (1.2 million kilometers) from  Saturn and roughly 600,000 miles (1 million kilometers) from Enceladus  and Epimetheus. Image scale is about 47 miles (75 kilometers) per pixel  on Saturn, 37 miles (60 kilometers) per pixel on Enceladus and 41 miles  (66 kilometers) per pixel Epimetheus. The Cassini-Huygens mission is a cooperative project of NASA, the  European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion  Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in  Pasadena, manages the mission for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate in  Washington. The Cassini orbiter and its two onboard cameras were  designed, developed and assembled at JPL. The imaging team is based at  the Space Science Institute, Boulder, Colo. Source.

47 miles (75 kilometers) per pixel on Saturn

project-argus:

A pair of Saturn’s moons appear insignificant compared to the immensity of the planet in this Cassini spacecraft view along the terminator where day transitions to night. The larger moon Enceladus (313 miles, or 504 kilometers across) is also on the left, just a bit closer to the center of the image. Epimetheus (70 miles, or 113 kilometers across) appears as a tiny black speck on the far left of the image, left of Enceladus, just below the thin line of the rings. The rings cast wide shadows on the southern hemisphere of the planet. This view looks toward the northern, sunlit side of the rings from just above the ringplane. The image was taken with the Cassini spacecraft wide-angle camera on Nov. 4, 2011 using a spectral filter sensitive to wavelengths of near-infrared light centered at 752 nanometers. The view was acquired at a distance of approximately 746,000 miles (1.2 million kilometers) from Saturn and roughly 600,000 miles (1 million kilometers) from Enceladus and Epimetheus. Image scale is about 47 miles (75 kilometers) per pixel on Saturn, 37 miles (60 kilometers) per pixel on Enceladus and 41 miles (66 kilometers) per pixel Epimetheus. The Cassini-Huygens mission is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the mission for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate in Washington. The Cassini orbiter and its two onboard cameras were designed, developed and assembled at JPL. The imaging team is based at the Space Science Institute, Boulder, Colo. Source.

47 miles (75 kilometers) per pixel on Saturn


cwnl:

Big Beautiful Saturn
Composition Credit: Mattias Malmer, Image Data: Cassini Imaging Team

cwnl:

Big Beautiful Saturn

Composition Credit: Mattias Malmer, Image Data: Cassini Imaging Team

cwnl:

Titan Surmised

In the above depiction, orange hydrocarbons color a landscape covered with lakes and peaks of frozen methane and ammonia. For illustration purposes, the Huygens probe is drawn parachuting down with an oversized Cassini spacecraft orbiting above.

Illustration Credit & Copyright: Craig Attebery, ESA, NASA

cwnl:

Titan Surmised

In the above depiction, orange hydrocarbons color a landscape covered with lakes and peaks of frozen methane and ammonia. For illustration purposes, the Huygens probe is drawn parachuting down with an oversized Cassini spacecraft orbiting above.

Illustration Credit & Copyright: Craig Attebery, ESA, NASA

cwnl:

Thin Rings Around Polarized Saturn
How thin are the rings of Saturn?
Brightness measurements from different angles have shown Saturn’s rings to be about one kilometer thick, making them many times thinner, in relative proportion, than a razor blade. This thinness sometimes appears in dramatic fashion during an image taken nearly along the ring plane. Additional guest appearance by Enceladus.
Credit: Cassini Imaging Team, SSI, JPL, ESA, NASA

cwnl:

Thin Rings Around Polarized Saturn

How thin are the rings of Saturn?

Brightness measurements from different angles have shown Saturn’s rings to be about one kilometer thick, making them many times thinner, in relative proportion, than a razor blade. This thinness sometimes appears in dramatic fashion during an image taken nearly along the ring plane. Additional guest appearance by Enceladus.

Credit: Cassini Imaging Team, SSI, JPL, ESA, NASA

cwnl:

Rain Showers on Titan
Copyright: David A. Hardy

cwnl:

Rain Showers on Titan

Copyright: David A. Hardy