skaterboytae:

Gigantic emission of plasma! ;P

opontoazul:

E se a Terra tivesse anéis como Saturno? (por Ckesk)

If The Earth Had Rings Like Saturn

cwnl:

Lasers Measure Earth’s Rotation and Wobble
The Earth spins around once every 24 hours on its axis, creating the continuous cycle of day and night. But this rotation isn’t as straightforward as it sounds: Forces large and small cause the Earth to wobble as it spins. This wobbling can pose a problem for navigation systems like GPS.
Scientists working with lasers and mirrors are refining a new system to track the Earth’s rotation and its kinks.
The pull of gravity from the sun and the moon contribute to the planet’s wobble. So do variations in atmospheric pressure, ocean loading and the wind, which change the position of the Earth’s axis relative to the surface. Together their effect is called the Chandler wobble, and it has a period of 435 days.
Another force causes the rotational axis to move over a period of a year. This “annual wobble” is due to the Earth’s elliptical orbit around the sun.

cwnl:

Lasers Measure Earth’s Rotation and Wobble

The Earth spins around once every 24 hours on its axis, creating the continuous cycle of day and night. But this rotation isn’t as straightforward as it sounds: Forces large and small cause the Earth to wobble as it spins. This wobbling can pose a problem for navigation systems like GPS.

Scientists working with lasers and mirrors are refining a new system to track the Earth’s rotation and its kinks.

The pull of gravity from the sun and the moon contribute to the planet’s wobble. So do variations in atmospheric pressure, ocean loading and the wind, which change the position of the Earth’s axis relative to the surface. Together their effect is called the Chandler wobble, and it has a period of 435 days.

Another force causes the rotational axis to move over a period of a year. This “annual wobble” is due to the Earth’s elliptical orbit around the sun.

the-star-stuff:

The storm clouds of Saturn are bigger than our entire planet

This striking image from the Cassini orbiter shows Saturn’s northern hemisphere engulfed in a massive storm that has raged for well over a year. This storm was bigger than Earth when it began, and it’s since gotten even more massive.
This storm is an apparent example of the Great White Spot, a recurring super-storm that periodically engulfs much of the planet’s northern hemisphere. This particular storm has raged since late 2010, and it underwent a second massive eruption in April 2011. It’s been given the catchy name of the Northern Electrostatic Interference, because the storm has caused a significant spike in the amount of radio and plasma interference. Cassini has also detected a huge temperature drop in the center of the storm system.
You might wonder why this is called the Great White Spot when the clouds are clearly orange. In this case, it’s the image that’s wrong — or, at least, in false color, as it’s actually an infrared image. (That blue line is actually the rings of Saturn viewed from the side.) The orange colors indicate clouds that are deep within Saturn’s atmosphere, while the lighter colors represent those closer to the edge of the planet’s massive cloud system. This storm is thought to be associated with the dawn of spring on Saturn. Of course, that could take awhile, considering a year on Saturn is nearly three Earth decades long.
Via NASA.

the-star-stuff:

The storm clouds of Saturn are bigger than our entire planet

This striking image from the Cassini orbiter shows Saturn’s northern hemisphere engulfed in a massive storm that has raged for well over a year. This storm was bigger than Earth when it began, and it’s since gotten even more massive.

This storm is an apparent example of the Great White Spot, a recurring super-storm that periodically engulfs much of the planet’s northern hemisphere. This particular storm has raged since late 2010, and it underwent a second massive eruption in April 2011. It’s been given the catchy name of the Northern Electrostatic Interference, because the storm has caused a significant spike in the amount of radio and plasma interference. Cassini has also detected a huge temperature drop in the center of the storm system.

You might wonder why this is called the Great White Spot when the clouds are clearly orange. In this case, it’s the image that’s wrong — or, at least, in false color, as it’s actually an infrared image. (That blue line is actually the rings of Saturn viewed from the side.) The orange colors indicate clouds that are deep within Saturn’s atmosphere, while the lighter colors represent those closer to the edge of the planet’s massive cloud system. This storm is thought to be associated with the dawn of spring on Saturn. Of course, that could take awhile, considering a year on Saturn is nearly three Earth decades long.

Via NASA.

cwnl:

Earth at Twilight

Credit: ISS Crew, Earth Sciences and Image Analysis Lab, JSC, NASA

cwnl:

Earth at Twilight

Credit: ISS Crew, Earth Sciences and Image Analysis Lab, JSC, NASA

the-star-stuff:

December 27, 2004: The Day Earth Survived Its Greatest Space-Ray Attack —Ever
It came suddenly from the distant reaches of the Constellation Sagittarius, some 50,000 light years away. For a brief instant, a couple of tenths of a second, on December 27, 2004 an invisible burst of energy the equivalent of half a million years of sunlight shone on Earth. Many orbiting satellites electronics were zapped and the Earth’s upper atmosphere was amazingly ionized from a massive hit of gamma ray energy.
The source of the invisible attack was a rare magnetar SGR 1806-20 on the other side of the Milky Way. These soft gamma ray repeaters, SGRs, occur when twisted magnetic fields attempt to re-align themselves and crack the magetar’s crust releasing the awesome burst or pulse of energy with a death-zone of a few light years. Magnetars have magnetic fields 1000 times those of ordinary pulsars -so powerful as to be lethal at a distance of 1000 kilometers.
Image at the top of the page is an rtist’s conception of a gamma-ray burst. The GRB is visible from Earth if the jets (yellow) are oriented so that one points toward us. (Image courtesy of NASA.)
via NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

the-star-stuff:

December 27, 2004: The Day Earth Survived Its Greatest Space-Ray Attack —Ever

It came suddenly from the distant reaches of the Constellation Sagittarius, some 50,000 light years away. For a brief instant, a couple of tenths of a second, on December 27, 2004 an invisible burst of energy the equivalent of half a million years of sunlight shone on Earth. Many orbiting satellites electronics were zapped and the Earth’s upper atmosphere was amazingly ionized from a massive hit of gamma ray energy.

The source of the invisible attack was a rare magnetar SGR 1806-20 on the other side of the Milky Way. These soft gamma ray repeaters, SGRs, occur when twisted magnetic fields attempt to re-align themselves and crack the magetar’s crust releasing the awesome burst or pulse of energy with a death-zone of a few light years. Magnetars have magnetic fields 1000 times those of ordinary pulsars -so powerful as to be lethal at a distance of 1000 kilometers.

Image at the top of the page is an rtist’s conception of a gamma-ray burst. The GRB is visible from Earth if the jets (yellow) are oriented so that one points toward us. (Image courtesy of NASA.)

via NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

project-argus:

astrotastic:


The Crescent Earth Reflected sunlight glows through the clouds over the far South Pacific.  Parts of South America and Antarctica are visible though the clouds.  This image was taken from 217,500 miles away, or almost the distance to  the Moon.
(source)

Absolutely gorgeous. I can’t tell you how much I love seeing the water of the oceans reflecting the Sun’s light from so far away - one of my favorite aspects of far-away pictures of Earth.

This is one of the most beautiful pictures I’ve ever seen, okay?

project-argus:

astrotastic:

The Crescent Earth Reflected sunlight glows through the clouds over the far South Pacific. Parts of South America and Antarctica are visible though the clouds. This image was taken from 217,500 miles away, or almost the distance to the Moon.

(source)

Absolutely gorgeous. I can’t tell you how much I love seeing the water of the oceans reflecting the Sun’s light from so far away - one of my favorite aspects of far-away pictures of Earth.

This is one of the most beautiful pictures I’ve ever seen, okay?