chaniall:

people shit on math and science because they’re not good at it y’all are like “being amazing at math and science doesn’t make you intelligent” nah man it literally does it’s just that if you aren’t amazing at math and science it doesn’t mean you’re unintelligent don’t shit on other people’s talents simply because they aren’t yours

postsfromthemrs:

theenthusiast7:

Space Bedding

Here is the link to buy.

pablophonic, which one you want? 

ageofdestruction:

occupancy: Solar corona, photographed by SOHO, 15th June 2014.

40 images, inverted, over 11 hours. 10 images per gif. 

Image credit: NASA/SOHO. Animation: AgeOfDestruction.

afro-dominicano:

An Interacting Colossus

This picture, taken by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope’s Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2), shows a galaxy known as NGC 6872 in the constellation of Pavo (The Peacock).
Its unusual shape is caused by its interactions with the smaller galaxy that can be seen just above NGC 6872, called IC 4970. They both lie roughly 300 million light-years away from Earth.
From tip to tip, NGC 6872 measures over 500 000 light-years across, making it the second largest spiral galaxy discovered to date. In terms of size it is beaten only by NGC 262, a galaxy that measures a mind-boggling 1.3 million light-years in diameter!
To put that into perspective, our own galaxy, the Milky Way, measures between 100 000 and 120 000 light-years across, making NGC 6872 about five times its size.

afro-dominicano:

An Interacting Colossus

This picture, taken by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope’s Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2), shows a galaxy known as NGC 6872 in the constellation of Pavo (The Peacock).

Its unusual shape is caused by its interactions with the smaller galaxy that can be seen just above NGC 6872, called IC 4970. They both lie roughly 300 million light-years away from Earth.

From tip to tip, NGC 6872 measures over 500 000 light-years across, making it the second largest spiral galaxy discovered to date. In terms of size it is beaten only by NGC 262, a galaxy that measures a mind-boggling 1.3 million light-years in diameter!

To put that into perspective, our own galaxy, the Milky Way, measures between 100 000 and 120 000 light-years across, making NGC 6872 about five times its size.

ageofdestruction:

intercity: Surface of the Sun, photographed by Solar Dynamics Observatory, 22nd February 2014.

11 frames, inverted 21.1 nm (2,000,000 K) + 17.1 nm (630,000 K) light. Sequence covers 3 hours.

Image credit: NASA/SDO, AIA/EVE/HMI. Animation: AgeOfDestruction.

sciencealert:









This is a colourised photograph of Albert Einstein taken during a lecture in Vienna, Austria, in 1921. To create colourised images, digital artists take a black and white or sepia photograph and use historical references to work out which colours should go where. This photo was originally taken by Ferdinand Schmutzer and coloured by Dana Keller from History in Color.

sciencealert:

This is a colourised photograph of Albert Einstein taken during a lecture in Vienna, Austria, in 1921. To create colourised images, digital artists take a black and white or sepia photograph and use historical references to work out which colours should go where. This photo was originally taken by Ferdinand Schmutzer and coloured by Dana Keller from History in Color.

spaceplasma:

Saturn’s Rings at Maximum Tilt

In March 2003, Saturn’s rings were at maximum tilt toward Earth, a special event occurring every 15 years. With the rings fully tilted, astronomers get the best views of the planet’s Southern Hemisphere. They took advantage of the rings’ unique alignment by using Hubble to capture some stunning images.

Credit: NASA, ESA, E. Karkoschka, G. Bacon (STScI)

spaceplasma:

Saturn’s Rings at Maximum Tilt

In March 2003, Saturn’s rings were at maximum tilt toward Earth, a special event occurring every 15 years. With the rings fully tilted, astronomers get the best views of the planet’s Southern Hemisphere. They took advantage of the rings’ unique alignment by using Hubble to capture some stunning images.

Credit: NASA, ESA, E. Karkoschka, G. Bacon (STScI)